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Author: bdhorwitz

“The Unveiling”: Suspense & Secrets, at Phoenix Theatre, S.F.

“The Unveiling”: Suspense & Secrets, at Phoenix Theatre, S.F.

Linda Ayres-Frederick Unwinds Immigrant Woes by Barry David Horwitz “The Unveiling” does a convincing and realistic job of getting across what a new immigrant in America must feel like. Once we are in the small apartment in post-WWII Brooklyn, we feel right at home with Linda Ayres-Frederick’s Rabinovitz family. In the ghetto, the Rabinovitz apartment offers a simple haven to Jewish immigrants, complete with Yiddish accents and intrusive reminders of the Nazi death camps. But in that tiny Brooklyn apartment,…

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“Thomas and Sally”: Founding Father Exposed, at Marin Theatre, Mill Valley

“Thomas and Sally”: Founding Father Exposed, at Marin Theatre, Mill Valley

Thomas Bradshaw’s Jaded Jefferson Exploits Slave Girl by Barry David Horwitz Thomas Bradshaw has stirred up a hornet’s nest. In “Thomas and Sally,” he is messing with Thomas Jefferson, and his long term sexual domination of his slave, Sally Hemings. In the play, Jefferson begins an “affair” with Hemings while he is Ambassador to France, when she is only 14 years old. After they return to Virginia and back to slavery, they have six children over thirty years. “Thomas and…

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“This Bitter Earth” Celebrates Gay & Black Lives, at NCTC, S.F.

“This Bitter Earth” Celebrates Gay & Black Lives, at NCTC, S.F.

Harrison David Rivers Evokes Lyrical Love & Loss by Barry David Horwitz At last a play that treats gay lovers like other lovers, exposing their virtues and faults. In “This Bitter Earth,” Jesse and Nick share love, debate issues, and conquer fear. “This Bitter Earth” puts a Black writer and his activist lover front and center, as they face personal and political issues as blossoming partners. Playwright Harrison David Rivers has put his smart, young black and white couple from…

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Hamlet: A Monumental Post-Industrial Puzzle, at ACT, S.F.

Hamlet: A Monumental Post-Industrial Puzzle, at ACT, S.F.

John Douglas Thompson Occupies Elsinore, Poetically by Barry David Horwitz Hamlet presents a huge challenge to actors, directors, and designers: Shall we go with the full text? Shall we use modern costumes? Should Hamlet be a confused adolescent or a philosopher? Does Hamlet have a plan? Does he love Ophelia? All these questions loom over Director Carey Perloff’s monumental and technically letter-perfect production, featuring the formidable talents of John Douglas Thompson, at the top of his form and a master…

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