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Author: Jeremiah Wall

“My Name Is Rachel Corrie” Springs to Life, at Magic Theatre, S.F.

“My Name Is Rachel Corrie” Springs to Life, at Magic Theatre, S.F.

Jonathan Kane Takes Rachel from Martyrdom to Poetry by Jeremiah Wall I went to “My Name is Rachel Corrie” by Sawtooth Productions at the Magic Theatre, expecting to hear the words of a strident young woman who took her politics so far that she died for her beliefs.  What I learned is that Rachel Corrie has many dimensions and much poetry in her character. Onstage at Fort Mason, guided by the light touch of Jonathan Kane’s direction, Charlotte Hemmings offers…

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“Princess Ida”: A Feminist Topsy-Turvy Turn, at Lyric Theatre, San Jose

“Princess Ida”: A Feminist Topsy-Turvy Turn, at Lyric Theatre, San Jose

Gilbert & Sullivan: “Someday My Prince Will Show Up in a Dress”   by Jeremiah Wall If you have seen Topsy Turvy, the movie about Gilbert & Sullivan, Lyric Theatre’s “Princess Ida, or Castle Adamant” (1884) offers the full effect of the absurd storytelling and sharp wit of W.S. Gilbert, coupled with Arthur Sullivan’s catchy tunes. San Jose’s Lyric has done a great job of gathering talent—for a compelling version of G & S. Although the plot of “Princess Ida”…

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“Holding the Edge”: Helping AIDS Patients in the 80s, at The Marsh, San Francisco

“Holding the Edge”: Helping AIDS Patients in the 80s, at The Marsh, San Francisco

Nurse Elaine Magree: A Night Shift to Remember by Jeremiah Wall In her shift as a nurse in late January 1986, Elaine Magree encounters death in the sky and on earth, and ends up not quite “Holding the Edge.” She finally tosses a garbage can through a large glass window, protesting Reagan’s lack of action in the AIDS crisis. The AIDS crisis washed over Oakland in the 80s, and care-givers were overwhelmed.  While working as a hospice nurse in the…

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“Uncanny Valley” Exposes Android Peril at Pear Theatre, Mountain View

“Uncanny Valley” Exposes Android Peril at Pear Theatre, Mountain View

Acting Human in the Valley by Jeremiah Wall We have all heard by now that automation will replace many more of today’s jobs. This startling fact is announced as if the matter were entirely settled, with no room for debate. Increasingly, our talk turns to robots, and Thomas Gibbons’ “Uncanny Valley,” on stage now at the Pear Theatre in Mountain View, shows us what happens when humans interact with lifelike robots. In the Valley, engineers refer to that uncomfortable feeling…

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