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Author: Jeremiah Wall

“Grandeur” Grows for Gil Scott-Heron, at Magic Theatre, S.F.

“Grandeur” Grows for Gil Scott-Heron, at Magic Theatre, S.F.

Han Ong Recalls Revolutionary Singer-Activist by Jeremiah Wall The title of Han Ong’s play “Grandeur” must be ironic, since the setting in a dimly-lit Harlem apartment is anything but grand. Ong has penned an imagined encounter between the pioneering performance poet, Gil Scott-Heron (a superb Carl Lumbly), and a young journalist from The New York Review of Books, Steve Barron (an earnest Rafael Jordan). The play shows us Scott-Heron past his prime, living with a younger woman, Miss Julie (electric…

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“Priscilla, Queen of the Desert”: Prophets in the Outback, at Rhino, S.F.

“Priscilla, Queen of the Desert”: Prophets in the Outback, at Rhino, S.F.

John Fisher Goes Fabulous for Magical Musical  by Jeremiah Wall Director John Fisher and Theatre Rhinoceros are staging “Priscilla, Queen of the Desert,” tapping a rich vein of song, dance, and drag—with colorful costumes galore. Three Aussie queens, Dorothy-like characters, follow their yellow brick road, from the gay friendly, safe harbor of Sydney, to the threatening desert outback of Oz. Along the way, they find friendship, family, and finally, romantic love. Scenic Designer Gilbert Johnson’s Priscilla, the ramshackle bus that…

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“My Name Is Rachel Corrie” Springs to Life, at Magic Theatre, S.F.

“My Name Is Rachel Corrie” Springs to Life, at Magic Theatre, S.F.

Jonathan Kane Takes Rachel from Martyrdom to Poetry by Jeremiah Wall I went to “My Name is Rachel Corrie” by Sawtooth Productions at the Magic Theatre, expecting to hear the words of a strident young woman who took her politics so far that she died for her beliefs.  What I learned is that Rachel Corrie has many dimensions and much poetry in her character. Onstage at Fort Mason, guided by the light touch of Jonathan Kane’s direction, Charlotte Hemmings offers…

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“Princess Ida”: A Feminist Topsy-Turvy Turn, at Lyric Theatre, San Jose

“Princess Ida”: A Feminist Topsy-Turvy Turn, at Lyric Theatre, San Jose

Gilbert & Sullivan: “Someday My Prince Will Show Up in a Dress”   by Jeremiah Wall If you have seen Topsy Turvy, the movie about Gilbert & Sullivan, Lyric Theatre’s “Princess Ida, or Castle Adamant” (1884) offers the full effect of the absurd storytelling and sharp wit of W.S. Gilbert, coupled with Arthur Sullivan’s catchy tunes. San Jose’s Lyric has done a great job of gathering talent—for a compelling version of G & S. Although the plot of “Princess Ida”…

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