Browsed by
Author: Kim Waldron

“The Congresswomen” Take Charge, at Exit Theater, S.F.

“The Congresswomen” Take Charge, at Exit Theater, S.F.

Aristophanes & Bousel Hit Home with Greek Slapstick by Kim Waldron Do America’s raging factions disturb you? Does wealth inequality frustrate you? Do you despair over absurd government leaders? Aristophanes felt the same way in 391 B.C., according to his satirical comedy “The Congresswomen.” Stealthily, Athenian women meet in front of two vibrant peach-hued houses.  They steal their husbands’ clothes, don false beards, and storm off to take over the Congress. At dawn, they elect their eloquent leader, Praxagora, head…

Read More Read More

“A Different Long Stretch of Earth”—New West Wrestles Old, at Ragged Wing, Oakland

“A Different Long Stretch of Earth”—New West Wrestles Old, at Ragged Wing, Oakland

Addie Ulrey Asks Questions It’s Safer to Ignore    by Kim Waldron Nimbly juggling a rifle between bare feet, 13-year-old, bi-gender Montanan Brucie puzzles over dragons while rolling along a ridge. Brucie just stole a box of bullets for the rifle, and the dragon talk reflects Brucie’s confusion over being abandoned as an infant. Brucie is fascinated by the Doomsday clock. You’d be right to worry. In “A Different Long Stretch of Earth,” history intrudes on everyone, including a fifth-generation…

Read More Read More

“Heisenberg”— Intriguing Tango for Two, at ACT, S.F.

“Heisenberg”— Intriguing Tango for Two, at ACT, S.F.

Simon Stephens’ Science of the Human Heart by Kim Waldron Riding on the London subway, a young woman impulsively kisses a much older man on the neck. Can he trust her? Can we trust them? Simon Stephen’s “Heisenberg” has just two characters, Alex and Georgie, opposites in every way. They embark on an affair, a romance, but maybe one is a con artist—or maybe all of that. And more. At 75, patient Alex (James Carpenter) works as a butcher, an Irish…

Read More Read More

“Revolt. She Said. Revolt Again.” Exhilarating, at Crowded Fire, S.F.

“Revolt. She Said. Revolt Again.” Exhilarating, at Crowded Fire, S.F.

Alice Birch’s Women Revel in Un-Civil Disobedience    by Kim Waldron The career woman wants more time off from work.  The young girl is forced to marry her rapist. A woman feels trapped by even the idea of married life.  Fear of rape. Domestic violence as a family tradition. Everything in “Revolt. She Said. Revolt Again.” reminds me of another woman I know. British playwright Alice Birch captures the world as it is. Then she issues a manifesto for revolution…

Read More Read More