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Author: Kim Waldron

“How To Be a White Man”: Lively Lessons at FaultLine Theater, S.F.

“How To Be a White Man”: Lively Lessons at FaultLine Theater, S.F.

Luna Malbroux Brings Heart & Humor to Social Justice by Kim Waldron Who better to deconstruct white male privilege than a queer Black woman, especially when she’s a gifted comedian? And especially when assisted by an extraordinarily talented group of actors? Luna Malbroux and Jennifer Lewis brew magic in “How to Be a White Man” by mixing Luna’s interviews with strangers across the country, her stand-up routine, and stories from her personal life. Sitting in the front row, waiting for…

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“New Girl in Town” Hits High Notes, at 42nd Street Moon, S.F.

“New Girl in Town” Hits High Notes, at 42nd Street Moon, S.F.

Bob Merrill’s Bad Girl Goes Good by Kim Waldron Lovers of musicals rhapsodize over how song and dance transform stories into epic events with emotions larger than life. They delight in the escapism of singing your problems away. All valid. But I stand with Stephen Frye who said attending a musical is “a celebration of talent.” 42nd Street Moon and Director Daren A.C. Carollo provide us ample opportunity to enjoy multiple talents with “New Girl in Town.” While the musical…

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“Baltimore Waltz”—a Bittersweet Spin, at Magic Theatre, S.F.

“Baltimore Waltz”—a Bittersweet Spin, at Magic Theatre, S.F.

Paula Vogel, Jonathan Moscone Make a Magical Mystery Tour by Kim Waldron A fantasia with lots of farcical sex and laughs, “The Baltimore Waltz” ultimately leads us to harsh truth. Kindly, playwright Paul Vogel, who wrote the play after her brother died of AIDS during the height of the pandemic, leaves us with hope. The Magic Theatre brings back Vogel’s 1992 play, directed by Jonathan Moscone, for a “Legacy Revival,” 25 years later, in their 50th season. Anna (a shining,…

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“The Merchant of Venice” Plays the Trump Card, at Theater of Others, S.F.

“The Merchant of Venice” Plays the Trump Card, at Theater of Others, S.F.

Shakespeare and Director Glenn Havlan Pull No Punches  by Kim Waldron Theater of Others’ “Merchant of Venice” refuses to downplay the bigotry of Shakespeare’s most appealing and sympathetic characters.  We see all their complexity and contradictions. Antonio–even though he is a generous friend to all–barely disguises his bigotry. The brilliant, fun-loving, and gutsy Portia snubs Jews socially and is heartless in the climactic court case. Antonio’s friends, so sincere and supportive, sit in the audience with us and shout horrible…

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