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Author: Kim Waldron

“Pint Sized Plays” Bring Melting Pot of Ideas to PianoFight, S.F.

“Pint Sized Plays” Bring Melting Pot of Ideas to PianoFight, S.F.

Six One-Acts Offer Joy for Everyone by Kim Waldron Need a reminder why we’re lucky to live in San Francisco in these new-monied, small-hearted times?  “Pint Sized Plays” provides one hell of a good reason with free, repeat FREE, six lively one-acts with colorful characters.  Their rules: action set in a bar, written by locals, and the length of a play cannot exceed the time it takes for one of its characters to drink a beer. The action must be…

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“How To Be a White Man”: Lively Lessons at FaultLine Theater, S.F.

“How To Be a White Man”: Lively Lessons at FaultLine Theater, S.F.

Luna Malbroux Brings Heart & Humor to Social Justice by Kim Waldron Who better to deconstruct white male privilege than a queer Black woman, especially when she’s a gifted comedian? And especially when assisted by an extraordinarily talented group of actors? Luna Malbroux and Jennifer Lewis brew magic in “How to Be a White Man” by mixing Luna’s interviews with strangers across the country, her stand-up routine, and stories from her personal life. Sitting in the front row, waiting for…

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“New Girl in Town” Hits High Notes, at 42nd Street Moon, S.F.

“New Girl in Town” Hits High Notes, at 42nd Street Moon, S.F.

Bob Merrill’s Bad Girl Goes Good by Kim Waldron Lovers of musicals rhapsodize over how song and dance transform stories into epic events with emotions larger than life. They delight in the escapism of singing your problems away. All valid. But I stand with Stephen Frye who said attending a musical is “a celebration of talent.” 42nd Street Moon and Director Daren A.C. Carollo provide us ample opportunity to enjoy multiple talents with “New Girl in Town.” While the musical…

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“Baltimore Waltz”—a Bittersweet Spin, at Magic Theatre, S.F.

“Baltimore Waltz”—a Bittersweet Spin, at Magic Theatre, S.F.

Paula Vogel, Jonathan Moscone Make a Magical Mystery Tour by Kim Waldron A fantasia with lots of farcical sex and laughs, “The Baltimore Waltz” ultimately leads us to harsh truth. Kindly, playwright Paul Vogel, who wrote the play after her brother died of AIDS during the height of the pandemic, leaves us with hope. The Magic Theatre brings back Vogel’s 1992 play, directed by Jonathan Moscone, for a “Legacy Revival,” 25 years later, in their 50th season. Anna (a shining,…

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