Browsed by
Author: Kim Waldron

“You for Me for You” Crosses Forbidden Borders, at Crowded Fire, S.F.

“You for Me for You” Crosses Forbidden Borders, at Crowded Fire, S.F.

Mia Chung Tracks Strangers in Strange Lands by Kim Waldron In “You for Me for You,” Playwright Mia Chung and Director M. Graham Smith track two North Korean sisters who are separately fleeing Our Dear Leader Kim Jong-Un. Their journeys lack any logical itinerary, turn surreal, and sometimes pass too slowly. Nevertheless, the sisters encounter moments so full of truth and high comedy that it’s worth the trip that leads us to a most unexpected outcome. Younger sister Junhee (a…

Read More Read More

“Leaving the Blues”: Alberta Hunter Comes OUT, at NCTC, San Francisco

“Leaving the Blues”: Alberta Hunter Comes OUT, at NCTC, San Francisco

Jewelle Gomez Exposes Our Star-Spangled Bigotry  by Kim Waldron Playwright Jewelle Gomez and Director Arturo Catricala bring home a painful truth in the brand new play “Leaving the Blues.” We know bigotry hurts the victim and corrupts the oppressor. We prefer to forget that bigotry also compels the persecuted to betray one another to survive.   Internationally renowned 1920s Blues singer and song-writer Alberta Hunter had the backbone to face Jim Crow laws, homophobia, and misogyny over her long career. But…

Read More Read More

“John” Summons the Uncanny, at A.C.T., San Francisco

“John” Summons the Uncanny, at A.C.T., San Francisco

Annie Baker’s People Are Haunted—Not the House by Kim Waldron A play that includes orgasm from congress with the universe, a shaky partition between the real and the otherworldly, looking for love in the wrong places, as well as deep philosophical matters, asks a great deal of attention from an audience. In the case of “John” by Annie Baker, we have to consider a “Larger Presence” and Neoplatonism, both tossed out for our contemplation. Baker makes us think, and I,…

Read More Read More

“Ideation” Questions Authority at Marin Onstage, San Rafael

“Ideation” Questions Authority at Marin Onstage, San Rafael

Just Doing Their  Jobs  by Kim Waldron “Ideation” by Aaron Loeb asks us to think about things we would rather not consider. A dark comedy with equal measures of humor and dread, Loeb’s play baffles (and rattles) us, as we watch ace corporate consultants in brainstorming sessions. Gradually, the recognizable managerial types slip from cold calculation of probabilities to confused paranoia.  Unless, of course, it’s not paranoia, but righteous outrage—and fear. When they first get down to work, three engineers…

Read More Read More