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Category: Theaters

“Berkeley Dance Project 2018” Takes Us Inside, at Playhouse, U.C., Berkeley

“Berkeley Dance Project 2018” Takes Us Inside, at Playhouse, U.C., Berkeley

CAL Choreographers Move Us Closer Together by Svea Vikander The stage has always been a place where gender can flow a bit more freely and in which collective desires take reign. In four individually choreographed pieces, the dancers of the Berkeley Dance Project let us imagine a world of exuberant non-conformity. They ask us to consider new ways of thinking of gender, bodies, caring work, and intimacy. And they make all of this—and back bends, and shoulder lifts, and tenderness—look…

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“The Lost Years” Delivers Laughs at Contra Costa Civic Theatre

“The Lost Years” Delivers Laughs at Contra Costa Civic Theatre

Cynthia Wands Reaches for Wit and Whimsy by Rosa del Duca At the center of “The Lost Years” are secrets. The first is that teacher and poet Humphrey Bludgepot (a peppy Ben Knoll) is not exactly who he says he is. In short, he is a hack, who grossly inflates his qualifications, and who just might be the worst poet you’ve ever heard. The play opens as Mr. Bludgepot is trying to regain his footing after a night of fever…

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“Fly Guy” Tickles Young Funny Bones, at Bay Area Children’s Theatre

“Fly Guy” Tickles Young Funny Bones, at Bay Area Children’s Theatre

Not Your Typical Pet, Not Your Typical Musical by Rosa del Duca Buzz (Benjamin Nguyen) really wants a pet, but instead of going to the animal shelter, he packs some gadgets into his little red wagon and heads outside. He doesn’t have to go far before running into a creature who can say his name. It’s a fly. He’s Fly Guy to be precise, played by the compelling, athletic, and delightful Dominic Dagdagan. A fast friendship is born. Buzz doesn’t…

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“Roe” Versus Women, Mothers, Others, at Berkeley Repertory Theatre

“Roe” Versus Women, Mothers, Others, at Berkeley Repertory Theatre

The play draws us in with the tension of competing narratives: the story as told by polished lawyer Sarah Weddington (Sarah Jane Agnew) who, along with Linda Coffee (a convincingly eccentric Susan Lynskey), argued the case; and the life and opinions of spunky Norma McCorvey (Sara Bruner), the pregnant and feisty “Roe,” who claims the lawyers deceived her into pressing the case.