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Tag: Family

“Signs” Sends a Magical Signal, at PianoFight, S.F.

“Signs” Sends a Magical Signal, at PianoFight, S.F.

David Gerard, Master Magician, Enchants & Seduces by Barry David Horwitz When personable, mysterious, lithe David Gerard re-enters the small stage at PianoFight, after having introducing himself to us, we suddenly realize that we are here for more than the magic show. We are here because a master magician has willed us here, and now we are in his capable hands. When the sleek Gerard in black jacket and black hipster pants glides onto the stage to start the show…

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“Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike”–Playful Dark Comedy, at CCCT, El Cerrito

“Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike”–Playful Dark Comedy, at CCCT, El Cerrito

Millennial Notes Christopher Durang’s Riff on Chekhov’s Entourage by Emily Colby Anton Chekhov, Snow White, Maggie Smith, Voodoo, and a shirtless 20-something. It’s like TV’s Chopped, where unexpected ingredients come together to create a pop-culture challenge. But, instead of cuisine, CCCT is serving up a fresh, fanciful comedy, called “Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike.” Chekhov’s early 20th  century Russia finds a new home in 21st Century Bucks County, Pennsylvania, one of the swankiest suburbs in the U.S. Well,…

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“Dance of the Holy Ghosts” Takes Us to Church, at Ubuntu, Oakland

“Dance of the Holy Ghosts” Takes Us to Church, at Ubuntu, Oakland

Marcus Gardley: Poet of Dysfunctional Love  by Robert M. Gardner Marcus (talented Michael Curry) recites poetry as he fumbles through puberty and on to adulthood, the mediator for his fractured family. Ubuntu Theater’s “Dance of the Holy Ghosts” by Marcus Gardley uses the talents of an all-Black cast to tell a powerful Oakland story in music and poetry. As we enter the Oakland Peace Center, Director Michael Socrates Moran’s impressive cast of versatile actors and gifted singers sweep us away…

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“A Number” Prophesies a Clone Crisis, at Aurora, Berkeley

“A Number” Prophesies a Clone Crisis, at Aurora, Berkeley

Caryl Churchill Spins the Numbers Game by Barry David Horwitz Behind a low, white circular barrier, suggesting a petri dish, an anxious son confronts his worried father. In her shocking play “A Number,” Caryl Churchill uses three cloned sons to make us think about the present threat of identity loss. She also catapults us into the future, to consider how Tech may be muddling our identities. Churchill is up to her poetic trickery as the sons extract different origin stories…

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