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Tag: Immigrants

“Gangster of Love”—A Spectacular Family Reunion, at Magic Theatre, S.F.

“Gangster of Love”—A Spectacular Family Reunion, at Magic Theatre, S.F.

Millennial Notes Hagedorn, Greco Create Masterful Visual Palette by Evelyn Arevalo “The Gangster of Love” by Jessica Hagedorn transports us to the 70s, to follow the outlandish exploits of the newly arrived Filipino Rivera family in San Francisco. Get ready to be amazed by a live action rock band, a psychedelic LSD trip, and a raucous birthday party. Director Loretta Greco gives us an intimate look into the Rivera family’s troubled assimilation into America. With them, we travel the familiar…

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“American Jornalero” Incarnates Workers’ Woes, at Ubuntu, Oakland

“American Jornalero” Incarnates Workers’ Woes, at Ubuntu, Oakland

Cardona, Collins Expose Exploitation on the Street by Robert M. Gardner In “American Jornalero,” director Tioni Collins takes a harsh and revealing look at the lives of four day- laborers who gather on a bleak street to look for work.  Only a cell phone and a graffiti-covered pay phone connect them to the world.  The four workers anxiously await calls—for a job, or even a lead. Ed Cardona Jr.’s “American Jornalero,” which premiered in New York in 2012, becomes a…

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“Vietgone”: Tantalizing Trip across Alien(ated) America, at ACT, S.F.

“Vietgone”: Tantalizing Trip across Alien(ated) America, at ACT, S.F.

Qui Nguyen Turns the War Topsy-Turvy by Drew Lehman “Vietgone” turns America’s conventional view of the Vietnam War on its head. Playwright Qui Nguyen follows Vietnamese refugees who lost everything: family, friends, and country. The refugees find themselves marooned in the white, unwelcoming American heartland.  Imagine their shock when they arrive in the country that sacrificed 53,000 soldiers to defend South Vietnam, only to learn that Americans detest them. Nguyen’s raw and bawdy production abandons polite U.S. points of view…

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“The Birthday Party” Shocks with Political Allegory, at ACT, S.F.

“The Birthday Party” Shocks with Political Allegory, at ACT, S.F.

Harold Pinter’s ‘Common Man’ Manipulated by Mom & Mafia by Barry David Horwitz “The Birthday Party” (1958), by Nobel Prize winner Harold Pinter, is a scary “comedy of menace” because we never know whether geeky Stanley is an artist, a failed pianist, a criminal on the run, or simply a sad sack. Stanley lives in a rundown seaside boarding house in England, asserting himself feebly against annoying mothering by his landlady—and worse. From the old-fashioned print wallpaper to the fried…

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