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“An Entomologist’s Love Story” Magnifies Dating Wars, at S.F. Playhouse

“An Entomologist’s Love Story” Magnifies Dating Wars, at S.F. Playhouse

Millennial Notes Melissa Ross Explores Funny Female Tactics by Tyler Jeffreys “An Entomologist’s Love Story” by Melissa Ross pits the feminist woman against the traditional woman in today’s Dating Wars. As Betty, Lori Prince changes her voice from deep and raunchy to light and airy, while she lectures on the mating rituals of fireflies. Betty, the entomologist, explains how the female firefly of Species A imitates the mating signal of Species B.  When the B male flies over, she gobbles…

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“Mystery of Love and Sex” Queries Friend-Sex in Gay Comedy, at NCTC, S.F.

“Mystery of Love and Sex” Queries Friend-Sex in Gay Comedy, at NCTC, S.F.

Bathsheba Doran Titillates Jewish-Black Passions by Barry David Horwitz In “The Mystery of Love and Sex,” daddy’s little girl Charlotte (bouncy Linda Maria Girón) and her troubled friend Jonny (thoughtful Kenny Scott) have been dear friends ever since grammar school in their southern town. Now, they co-habit away at college—oh! no sex–not part of the deal. Charlotte would love to get it on with her best bud, but Jonny ain’t goin’ there. We begin to suspect that one or both…

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“Born Yesterday” Arouses Laughter, Reflection, at S.F. Playhouse

“Born Yesterday” Arouses Laughter, Reflection, at S.F. Playhouse

Garson Kanin Predicts Trumpian Times by Robert M. Gardner Set Designer Jacqueline Scott has fashioned a spectacular, opulent, hotel suite with floor to ceiling windows overlooking the U.S. Capitol. The stunning set features two story high pillars, a curving staircase, and elegant, crystal bedecked wall sconces. These lavish surroundings mask the corruption of Garson Kanin’s play, “Born Yesterday” (1946). In 1950, “Born Yesterday” tickled movie audiences, too, during the McCarthy Red Scare. Kanin’s play features a blustering, self-made billionaire, err…millionaire,…

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We’re Afraid of Virginia Woolf at Shotgun Players, Berkeley

We’re Afraid of Virginia Woolf at Shotgun Players, Berkeley

George and Martha need an audience to watch them tear each other apart, even if only their sober selves gazing down from a mid-century modern platform in their mid-century modern apartment. That’s the real uncomfortable truth of the play: we, innocent audience members, stare with mouths agape at infinitely creative methods of injury and find the taste it leaves in our mouths is painful and delicious.