Browsed by
Author: Evelyn Arevalo

“Native Gardens” Cultivates Border Wars, at TheatreWorks, Mountain View

“Native Gardens” Cultivates Border Wars, at TheatreWorks, Mountain View

Millennial Notes Karen Zacarias Mixes Flowers, Fun, & Frenemies by Evelyn Arevalo & Tyler Jeffreys “Native Gardens” reminds me of the sitcom “Married with Children,” with hilarious, exaggerated figures who talk shit while loving each other. Emotions temporarily blind neighbors from seeing each other honestly. We can see how alike they actually are, as they thrash around in each other’s gardens.  Karen Zacarias provides us with insights on how young and old, Democrat and Republican can all get along. Karen…

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“#Get Ghandi” Amuses & Bewilders, at Z Space, S.F.

“#Get Ghandi” Amuses & Bewilders, at Z Space, S.F.

Millennial Notes Anne Galjour Examines First World ‘Feminism’ by Evelyn Arevalo   Anne Galjour does not shy away from revealing the dark secrets of Mahatma Gandhi in her new, intense comedy “#GetGandhi, A Seriously Radical Feminist Comedy.” Gandhi, who has inspired generations with his principle of non-violent civil disobedience, committed some shady acts against women. Though Gandhi practiced celibacy, he actively persuaded young women to lie naked next to him, to test his piety. Although Gandhi’s misogyny and racism seem…

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“Hold These Truths” Captivates Hearts, at TheatreWorks, Palo Alto

“Hold These Truths” Captivates Hearts, at TheatreWorks, Palo Alto

Millennial Notes Jeanne Sakata Illuminates One Man’s Supreme Court Fight by Evelyn Arevalo Playwright Jeanne Sakata brings to life the terrors of the U.S. Japanese concentration camps during WWII in a gripping one man show. Joel de la Fuente plays Gordon Hirabayashi, born in Seattle, who stood up against the unconstitutional camps in the 40s. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, authorizing the removal and relocation of American citizens to these camps. As Gordon Hirabayashi, Joel de la…

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“White” Unleashes Hidden Voices, at Shotgun, Berkeley

“White” Unleashes Hidden Voices, at Shotgun, Berkeley

Millennial Notes James Ijames  Leaves Us Hungry for Color by Evelyn Arevalo “White” explores how white men–including gay white men–have consistently engaged in stereotyping Black women. Case in point: Imitators regularly profit by stealing the mannerisms of Black women by “acting Black.” It’s so typical that we even have a name for it: Culture Vultures. Our lead character Gus (believable Adam Donovan), an aspiring painter,  is magically visited by a silvery, sequined Diana Ross. His Divine Diana (dynamic Santoya Fields)…

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